Antibody Testing

Ongoing voluntary antibody testing is available statewide for anyone in Arizona over age 18, including students, employees and Designated Campus Colleagues (DCCs) who are not experiencing symptoms, through the University of Arizona IRB-approved research study. 

Antibody Testing

  • determines whether you have developed an immune response to COVID-19 infection or vaccination.
  • is not used to diagnose an active infection.

Locations: CATS Research Center on the Health Sciences Campus in Tucson, and other locations statewide.

Method: Blood draw

Results: 10 -15 business days

If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you should wait a minimum of 14 days after your positive test before registering for an antibody test. If you have been vaccinated for COVID-19, you should wait a minimum of 14 days after receiving your second/final dose before registering for an antibody test.

View locations and schedule test Antibody Test Fact Sheet


FAQ

An antibody test is a blood test that can confirm that your body's immune system has developed antibodies against the COVID-19 virus after you have been infected or vaccinated. Antibodies  help you fight off infections and can potentially protect you from getting the disease again.

Antibody testing is available for anyone in Arizona over age 18 through a University of Arizona IRB-approved research study. Researchers are interested in studying antibodies and immunity over time.

Antibody testing can help you learn about your immune status. Getting a test can confirm that you have been exposed to COVID-19 in the past and have developed antibodies against the virus. If you have been vaccinated, getting a test can confirm antibody response to the vaccine.

Antibody testing through the IRB-approved research study can also help researchers learn more and answer questions about COVID-19 and immunity, including: How long does immunity last? How many antibodies does it take to achieve protection against infection? How does age affect immune responses to infection or vaccination? How do symptoms after infection or vaccination correlate with antibody levels?

Most people who are infected by the virus make antibodies within a few weeks of infection. Most people who are vaccinated for COVID-19 make antibodies within a few weeks of being fully vaccinated. However, the amounts of antibodies vary among individuals, and a fraction of people make low or no antibodies. Low levels of antibodies might not be detected by this test.

If you have questions about your antibody test results, please contact the Antibody Testing call center: 520-848-4064 (local), 833-985-2304 (toll-free) or antibodytesting@arizona.edu. Phone lines are open Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Arizona time.

In the absence of symptoms, it is unlikely for someone to have a positive antibody test and currently be infected.

An antibody test is a blood test that can confirm that your body’s immune system has developed antibodies against the COVID-19 virus after you have been infected or vaccinated. Antibodies help you fight off infections and can potentially protect you from getting the disease again. A COVID-19 virus test (for example, a PCR Saline Gargle or antigen test) determines if you are currently infected with COVID-19.

A positive test result indicates your body's immune system has developed antibodies in response to infection or vaccination. By itself, it does not indicate current infection. Testing positive for antibodies does not indicate lasting immunity to COVID-19.

Results from your test should be available 10 -15 working days after the test. You will receive an email to let you know when your results are available.

The presence of COVID-19 antibodies means that your immune system mounted a response against the virus after being infected or vaccinated.

Participating in the IRB-approved research study will help researchers continue to answer questions about COVID-19 and how long immunity lasts. We do not yet know the amounts of antibodies that are required to fully prevent subsequent infections. Because we still do not know enough about this virus, protection should not be assumed and you should continue to follow all applicable local, state, and federal public health guidance aimed at mitigating the spread of COVID-19, regardless of your test result.

For the safety of our team members, other participants and our community, individuals with active COVID-19 symptoms will not be included in the current antibody testing. All participants will be screened for symptoms before their appointment, and anyone showing symptoms will not move forward in the process.

Ongoing voluntary antibody testing is available statewide for anyone in Arizona over age 18.

Yes. If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you should wait a minimum of 14 days after your positive test before registering for an antibody test. If you have been vaccinated for COVID-19, you should wait a minimum of 14 days after receiving your second/final dose before registering for an antibody test. When you register for the IRB-approved research study you will be asked to provide you vaccination date(s), if applicable.